Home » Elon Musk’s Space Travel Predicted In Book Written 70 Years Ago – Tesla CEO Becomes Part Of Prophecy

Elon Musk’s Space Travel Predicted In Book Written 70 Years Ago – Tesla CEO Becomes Part Of Prophecy

It’s no secret that Elon Musk has pledged to get humans to Mars by 2024. However, after a fan tweeted about a book from 70 years ago that references someone called Elon promising the same thing, people are now wondering if this project was predicted almost 70 years ago.

Musk posted the following to Twitter and fan, Toby Li, responded to this tweet highlighting the book that he had found.

Wernher von Braun, a rocket scientist and engineer, authored the book “Mars Project: A Technical Tale.” Von Braun was a Nazi rocket scientist at the beginning of his career. During his time in Nazi Germany’s rocket development program, he worked on several projects. Following World War II, the United States recruited Von Braun and roughly 1,600 other German engineers and scientists to work for a top-secret intelligence operation called Operation Paperclip.

Von Braun also became involved in an initiative to generate content in various media including books, televised appearances, and toys to produce narratives that explained technical concepts to non-scientists. His book “Mars Project” was intended to chronicle a Mars expedition.

Toby Li was a little off with his tweet, however, as according to von Braun’s book, the most powerful person on Mars will be known as the “Elon,” not that his or her name will be Elon. Another user, Pranay Pathole, drew attention to the distinction:

Last month, Elon Musk announced that SpaceX intends to transport people to Mars within the next ten years. On an episode of the Lex Fridman Podcast, Musk discussed his company’s efforts to reach Mars in detail.

“Engineering the vehicle” is the key to this success, according to Musk. “The Starship is the most complex and advanced rocket ever made,” he added.

Musk went on to explain:

“The fundamental optimization of Starship is minimizing the cost per ton to orbit — and ultimately cost per ton to orbit and ultimately cost per ton to the surface of Mars,”